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Ice T reacts to the hoopla over his ‘twin’ daughter

A photo of Ice T’s look-alike 5-year-old daughter Chanel went viral and, according to him, it yielded some nice results.

On Wednesday, the “Law & Order: SVU” star tweeted a thank you on behalf of his daughter with wife Coco Austin.

“Today @BabyChanelworld just wanted to say THANKS! for all the recent internet LOVE she’s been getting… 48k Twitter and 447k IG followers,” the tweet read. “Not bad for a 5yr old.”

The photo posted on the youngster’s Twitter account shows Austin holding Chanel at a concert for her dad’s band Body Count.

Social media went wild for it, noting that the 5-year-old looked exactly like her father.

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DJ Cuppy paid her dad Femi Otedola a visit in one of his mansions abroad.

DJ Cuppy in her father’s house Recently, the Gelato crooner paid her dad Femi Otedola a visit in one of his mansions abroad and she shared lovely photos.

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Recall DJ Cuppy never jokes with spending some personal time with her family. Every time the singer visits her parent’s home, she makes sure to share photos on her social media page.

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We are not responsible for the death of a 14-year-old beverage seller- Lagos State Police Command.

The Lagos State Police Command has reacted to the death of a 14-year old-breverage seller at Ojota on Saturday. Claiming they didn’t shoot any live rounds.

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The body of a teenage girl with blood-stained clothes and a hole on her chest, suggested a possible hit by a stray bullet during the Oodua Nation mega rally held at Freedom Park.

The police had in the course of dispersing the agitators, fired gunshots into the air, shot teargas canisters and also used water cannons.

But in a statement by spokesman, Olumuyiwa Adejobi, denied its operatives fired live bullets at the rally, describing the allegation as a calculated attempt to create confusion and fears in the minds of the good people of Lagos State and the country at large.

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A Boeing 737 cargo plane makes emergency landing in the water near Honolulu after pilots reported engine trouble

The pilots early Friday morning told air traffic controllers one of their engines had failed moments before the flight went down, the FAA said in a statement.

“The pilots had reported engine trouble and were attempting to return to Honolulu when they were forced to land the aircraft in the water,” the Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement, adding both crew members were rescued. “The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.”

The plane, a Boeing 737, had taken off from Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport at 1:33 a.m., according to Flightradar 24. The flight-tracking website shows that shortly after it took off, the plane — referred to by the FAA’s statement as Transair flight 810 — began turning right and then signaled it was diverting to a nearby airport, Kalaeloa Airport. 

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One survivor who was seen on the tail of the aircraft was carried out of the water by the rescue helicopter and airlifted to a Honolulu hospital, while the other was rescued by officials from the Airport Rescue Fire Fighters based at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.

The pilots reported they could not maintain airspeed and altitude following the failure of one of two engines on the Boeing 737-200, according to the recordings, and that they suspected the second engine would also fail.

“We’ve lost number one engine and we’re coming straight to the airport,” a crew member said, requesting that air traffic controllers begin dispatching the airport fire department. “We’re going to lose the other engine, too. It’s running very hot.”

The plane went down approximately two nautical miles south of Kalaeloa, Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew West of the US Coast Guard District 14 Hawaii Pacific said.

Both crew members were brought to Queens Medical Center, West said, though he did not have information about their conditions.

“The weather on scene at the time of the rescue was winds of 17 mph and seas up to 5 feet,” the spokesman said in a subsequent news release.

According to the company website, Transair uses their Boeing 737 fleet to provide air cargo and charter services throughout Hawaii. The company has been in business since 1982.

“We are working with the Coast Guard, the FAA and NTSB to secure the scene and investigate the cause,” Riahi said. “Our most immediate concern is the care and recovery of our colleagues.”

FAA records show the plane was manufactured in 1975. It’s last airworthiness certificate was issued in 2015 and was set to expire in 2024.

A Boeing spokesperson said the company was “aware of the reports out of Honolulu, Hawaii and are closely monitoring the situation.”

“We are in contact with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board and are working to gather more information.”

The NTSB initially said they will be sending a team of seven investigators to look into the incident, but the agency later said it would send ten.

it responded to a report of a downed plane south of the island of Oahu at around 1:40 a.m. and that both people on board were rescued, with help from the Honolulu Fire Department.

Transair, a Hawaiian cargo carrier, which specializes in flying freight between the islands, didn’t immediately return a request for comment. The airline has been operating since 1982, according to its website.

We are proud of our unblemished record in providing the longest running All Cargo operation in the State of Hawaii,” says a message on Transair’s website.

The plane was a 737-200, part of the first generation of 737s developed in the 1960s.

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US spinster Sha’Carri Richardson Suspended for one month after positive test for marijuana.

US track and field star Sha’Carri Richardson has been suspended for one month from the Olympic team after testing positive for THC, a chemical found in marijuana, the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) announced on Friday

“The rules are clear, but this is heartbreaking on many levels; hopefully, her acceptance of responsibility and apology will be an important example to us all that we can successfully overcome our regrettable decisions, despite the costly consequences of this one to her,” said USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart in a press release.

Richardson had booked her spot at the Tokyo Olympics with a runaway victory in the women’s 100m at the US Olympic track and field trials in Eugene, Oregon last month. Due to the positive test, her Olympic trials results were automatically disqualified and she will not be allowed to participate in her signature 100m race at the Tokyo Olympics later this month.

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Travis T. Tygart Statement reads:

“Richardson’s competitive results obtained on June 19, 2021, including her Olympic qualifying results at the Team Trials, have been disqualified, and she forfeits any medals, points, and prizes. Beyond the one-month sanction, athlete eligibility for the Tokyo Games is determined by the USOPC and/or USA Track & Field eligibility rules.”

“Sha’Carri Richardson’s situation is incredibly unfortunate and devastating for everyone involved,” USA Track and Field said in a statement. “Athlete health and well-being continue to be one of USATF’s most critical priorities and we will work with Sha’Carri to ensure she has ample resources to overcome any mental health challenges now and in the future.” 

It’s unclear whether Richardson will miss the Games altogether. She may still be eligible to compete in another event besides the 100m, such as the 4x100m relay.

Richardson appeared on NBC’s TODAY show on Friday morning and said: “I just want to take responsibility for my actions, I know what I did, I know what I’m supposed to do, I’m allowed not to do and I still made that decision. I’m not making an excuse or looking for any empathy in my case.”

Richardson cited finding out from a reporter that her biological mother had passed away as part of the reason she consumed marijuana, saying: “I was just thinking it would be a normal interview and then on the interview to hear that information come from a complete stranger, it was definitely triggering, it was nerve shocking because it’s like who are you to tell me that?

“From there just blinded by emotions, blinded by bad news, blinded by just hiding hurt, honestly for the fact that I can’t hide myself, so at least in some type of way, I was trying to hide my pain.”

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the USADA label cannabis as a banned substance as it “poses a health risk to athletes, has the potential to enhance performance and violates the spirit of sport.”

“Everything I do comes from me naturally. No steroid(s). No anything. This incident was about marijuana. After my sanctions are up, I’ll be back and able to compete and every single time I step on the track I’ll be ready to compete for whatever anti-doping agency to come and get what it is that they need,” Richardson concluded.

Meanwhile the presence of marijuana on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned substance list has long been controversial. Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati was originally stripped of his 1998 Olympic gold medal after testing positive for THC but that decision was overturned since it wasn’t on the banned substance list at the time. USADA singles out three reasons why cannabinoids are banned: athletes could endanger themselves and others because of slower reaction times and poor executive function and decision making, marijuana can be “performance enhancing for some athletes and sports disciplines,” and the use of “illicit drugs that are harmful to health” is “not consistent with the athlete as a role model for young people around the world”.

As for the moral high-horse bit: can anyone reasonably argue, in this day and age, that an athlete using marijuana deserves a boot from the Olympics because such behavior is “not consistent with the athlete as a role model for young people around the world?” In a world where momentum for legalization is growing (it’s legal in Oregon, where Richardson competed at Trials)? In a situation where someone may have turned to a legal substance to cope with grief? Come on.

None of these reasons seem to apply in Richardson’s case. She endangered no one at the track: quite the opposite, she distanced herself from the competition. The performance-enhancing benefits of marijuana are, if not specious, at least very much up for debate. A 2018 literature review published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, for example, said that “although cannabis use is more prevalent in some athletes engaged in high-risk sports, there is no direct evidence of performance-enhancing effects in athletes.” Even USADA’s statement on Richardson’s suspension acknowledges “her use of cannabis occurred out of competition and was unrelated to sport performance.”